Artist Lizzie Gill frames her collages

 

It's hard to not stop and look at New York artist Lizzie Gill's work. We're seeing the surreal style she practices everywhere these days, but her attention to detail, authentic vintage materials, and meticulously conceived compositions really set her work apart. But what exactly do these pieces mean? What do they say about society? What inspires her to create them? We had so many questions. So, we turned to Lizzie to get some answers. Meet artist (and Framebridge Team favorite) Lizzie Gill.


 
 

“I can't speak another language fluently, but art drives me to communicate through a universal language.”

Tell us how you got started! Did you always know you wanted to be an artist? My first artwork I can remember was on archival paper in crayon, when I was three. Since then, it has been an important part of my life. I became serious about art when I decided to pursue it academically and spend the time afterwards turning it into my career.

What is it that drives you to create? My love for art as a communicative tool. I can't speak another language fluently, but art drives me to communicate through a universal language.

That's such a beautiful way to think about art. How do you juggle being an artist, and a businesswoman? Don't have a choice! I make time to cultivate both aspects of the business, they go hand in hand.

 
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What do you hope to convey with your work? I hope to convey a sense of irony about modern pursuits of romance, by juxtaposing it with imagery from the past.

Conveying an altered representation of yourself through makeup and clothes is nothing new. And technology can often make this seem like a bad thing. Is it because the human element is missing? Not necessarily a bad thing, just the new normal. I do conceptually focus on the lack of human interaction during modern courtship, due to the use of technology. I find there is more room for misinterpretation when the human element is missing.

How do you go about doing that? Walk us through your process. First, I have to source the central collage element for the composition. That means looking through stacks and stacks of vintage publications in search of something that resonates with me. I will then work on the layout of the composition and begin the painterly hole punching technique. When I’m working digitally, I paint and collage in photoshop. 

“I find there is more room for misinterpretation when the human element is missing.”

 
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How does framing change your work? It makes it feel ready to be exhibited, whether in a gallery or someone’s home. It’s definitely an important finishing touch. I love seeing my work framed, it makes the piece feel permanent and the process completed.


We can't wait to frame your next Lizzie Gill piece.