TBT: Five Things We Learned from Architectural Digest March 2012

Via Architectural Digest

Via Architectural Digest

 

The best part about Thursday (beside being Friday Eve) is we all get to take a trip down memory lane. Today let's throw it back to March 2012 and remember what was decking the walls and halls of the uber chic. First step: reference the bible of design - aka Architectural Digest. Step two: be pleasantly surprised to find out it was the celebrity issue, and Brook Shields's gorgeous New York townhouse graced the cover. Turns out what was stylish in 2012 is still stylish today. Keep scrolling to get the best of 2012, today.


I. Diptychs Can Balance a Design

 
Via Architectural Digest

Via Architectural Digest

 

Each side of Brooke's mantle features a different furniture piece. A marble topped table on the left, and a beautiful, heavy chest of drawers on the right. The portraits by Will Cotton of Shields’s two daughters that hang above the furniture unite the look through the cohesiveness of the artist style and consistent frame choice. 

Want to get the look? Try framing two portraits by the same artist in our wide sloped Chelsea frame

II. Column Gallery Walls are Always a Good Idea

 
Via Architectural Digest

Via Architectural Digest

 

As you might have read in this blog post, we're huge fans of column gallery walls. They're the perfect way to accent small spaces between windows (like you see above), or lonely corners that need a little love. The cool thing about these displays is that you can get playful with what you choose to frame. Here Brooke features a trio of rabbit paintings by Hunt Slonem in heavy gold frames adding a whimsical, graphic look to the space.

Want to get the look? Consider a trio of small modern art pieces that build upon each other. Frame in our antique gold Georgetown frame to add a vintage feel.

 

III. Make a Statement with Large Leaning Art 

Via Architectural Digest

Via Architectural Digest

 

If you're lucky enough to have a mantle somewhere in your home we highly recommend using that design opportunity to feature a big, beautiful piece of art. (Please, we beg you, don't waste the space on mounting your flat screen.) In Brooke's kitchen she's chosen a very literal painting for the kitchen by Malcolm Liepke. 

Want to get the look? Check out the Metropolitan Museum of Art's recently released collection of creative commons images (we've picked a few below). Download you favorite(s) and upload to our site for printing and framing. We suggest our Potomac frame style for traditional art. You can't beat how it's layered gold foil finish truly seems to glow in the sunlight.

IV. Everything is Frameworthy

 
 

We may sound like a broken record here, but everything really is frameworthy. (If you don't believe us, please read this story on a piece of cardboard we framed.) Now, we might not all have a piece of wrapping paper full of doodles by artist Keith Haring from a gift he gave us for our birthday, but you get the idea. Need a little framing inspiration? Check out this post for some of the craziest things we've framed. 

V. Leaning Gallery Walls are Your Friend

 
Robert Mapplethorpe and Annie Leibovitz, are propped alongside works by Richard Avedon, Adam Fuss, and others.

Robert Mapplethorpe and Annie Leibovitz, are propped alongside works by Richard Avedon, Adam Fuss, and others.

 

It was true five years ago, and it's true today. Leaning gallery walls are the best way to make a casual, yet sophisticated statement. You can rearrange them as you please without worrying about wrecking your walls, and you can easily add in pieces as your collection grows. To keep it from looking messy we suggest keeping one thing consistent in your display. Here, Brooke has stuck to a monochromatic mix of black and white. Want to try this look out yourself? Check out this post on how to build a ledge gallery wall.

We suggest mixing and matching wide and thin profile gallery frames, and incorporating a mix of matted and non-matted art to add texture to your collection.


That concludes our look back at March 2012. Head over to our Pinterest for plenty more inspiration.